By The Numbers: Interracial Marriage Data

Kim Kardashian and Kanye West arrive at the 2016 MTV Video Music Awards in New York (The Huffington Post)

FILE PHOTO – Kim Kardashian and Kanye West arrive at the 2016 MTV Video Music Awards in New York, U.S., August 28, 2016. REUTERS/Eduardo Munoz/File Photo

The 50th anniversary of the Loving v. Virginia case is soon approaching. The case struck down bans on interracial marriage, and continues to resonate today. With that in mind, I was curious to see any data on interracial marriages: Has the number gone up? Has societal disapproval gone down?

Let’s take a look:

Who’s Marrying Out?

  • In 1970, less than 1% of all married couples were interracial.
  • In 1980, 6%+ of newlyweds were interracial, and only 3% of all marriages were interracial.
  • In 2013, 12% of newlyweds (a record high) married someone of a different race, and 6.3% of all marriages were interracial.
The Absolute Rise of Intermarriage (Priceonomics)

The Absolute Rise of Intermarriage (Priceonomics)

Who’s Down with Marrying Out?

  • In 1986, only 30% of survey respondents felt interracial marriage is acceptable for everyone. But that same percentage of respondents did not feel interracial marriage was acceptable for anyone.
  • In 2009, 83% of survey respondents were accepting of interracial marriage.
  • In 2012, 93% of people approve of interracial marriage.

And let’s end on one more noteworthy statistic that warms my heart and gives me hope for the future:

“More than four-in-ten Americans (43%) say that more people of different races marrying each other has been a change for the better in our society.”

 

 

Brittney Griner/Glory Johnson Annulment: How Many Same-Sex Marriages End?

Glory Johnson and Brittney Griner (Forward Times Online)

Glory Johnson and Brittney Griner (Forward Times Online)

Phoenix Mercury star Brittney Griner filed for an annulment from her wife Glory Johnson, who plays for the Tulsa Shock. The two WNBA stars married May 8th, and Johnson announced her pregnancy June 4th.

With acceptance of same-sex marriage gaining ground, divorce will naturally follow. But how many same-sex marriages end?

It’s hard, and probably too early, to find concrete and up-to-date statistics on this. In 2011, UCLA’s Williams Institute found that same-sex couples who’ve formalized their commitment had a divorce rate of 1%+. This is lower than the annual divorce rate of heterosexual married couples, which is 2%.

Around 150K same-sex couples have married or otherwise committed to each other, so that would mean around 3K same-sex couples divorce each year. I couldn’t find any stats solely for annulments.

But in 2013, Pew Research Center’s FactTank found that same-sex marriages numbered around 71K+. It did take into account that there might be some underreporting going on.

As time passes and more same-sex marriages and divorces/annulments/separations are recorded, we’ll be able to see a clearer picture of any trends.

 

How Many Countries Offer Paternity Leave?

Dad with newborn baby (Babble)

Dad with newborn baby (Babble)

Happy Friday! Last month, Massachusetts passed a law requiring businesses to give eight weeks of paternity leave. That’s right, paternity leave. For the fathers. The U.S. doesn’t have a paid paternity leave policy (come on, we don’t even have a paid maternity leave policy), though the 1993 Family and Medical Leave Act offers 12 weeks of protection, but only if the employee has been working for the company for over a year and the company contains over 50 people. The new law would include companies with a minimum of six employees.

Work-life balance is increasingly becoming more of a concern for men as well as women, and the concept comes sharply into focus with the addition of children. The U.S. lags behind other countries in our paternity leave policies. A 2013 Pew Research Center study examined 38 countries, and found that 25 of them have guaranteed paternity leave for new fathers. Time off can range from less than one week to over eight weeks.

Several countries that offer paternity leave are within Europe. Norway, Ireland, Iceland, Slovenia, Sweden and Germany have protected paternity leave, which would allow a new father time off secure that he’ll be able to return to his job without being fired or let go. At least a portion of this time off is required to be paid, except in Ireland.

South Korea also has a paternity leave policy, in which new fathers can take up to five days off. But parents with children under three years old can request to work part- or full-time for one year to care for their child. It appears that this policy applies to both mothers and fathers.

Hopefully this new law will push policy towards a national paid leave policy, for both mothers and fathers.