Women’s DIY Halloween Costumes: By The Numbers

Sexy Rosie the Riveter costume

Sexy Rosie the Riveter costume

DIY has been a big trend for a few years now. It makes sense that it’s spread to Halloween costumes, where the major goals are to display creativity and individuality.

With this in mind, I wanted to see how many women’s magazines were touting DIY costumes, and parsing out any trends I could see. I initially wanted to find three lists from three different publications from this year, but had to settle for those from varying years. I looked lists from “Glamour” (published in 2010), “Marie Claire” (2013) and “Cosmopolitan” (2014).

Let’s take a look at what I found:

“Glamour:”

Year Published: 2010

Number of Entries: 21

Number of Movie-Referenced Costumes: 1

Number of TV-Referenced Costumes: 5

Number of Children’s Pop-Culture-Referenced Costumes: 0

Number of Iconic Cultural Figure References: 4

Outliers: includes 1 music-inspired costume, 9 creative* costumes

 

Marie Claire:”

Year Published: 2013

Number of Entries: 10

Number of Movie-Referenced Costumes: 4

Number of TV-Referenced Costumes: 2

Number of Children’s Pop-Culture-Referenced Costumes: 0

Number of Iconic Cultural Figure References: 1

Outliers: includes 1 celebrity baby costume, 1 music-inspired costume

 

Cosmopolitan:”

Year Published: 2014

Number of Entries: 20

Number of Movie-Referenced Costumes: 10

Number of TV-Referenced Costumes: 3

Number of Children’s Pop-Culture-Referenced Costumes: 5

Number of Iconic Cultural Figure References: 2

Outliers: includes 2 comic-book-referenced costumes, 4 Disney characters, 1 school girl costume

 

Overlaps:

Sandy from “Grease:” “Marie Claire” and “Cosmopolitan”

Rosie the Riveter: “Marie Claire” and “Cosmopolitan”

Sookie Stackhouse from “True Blood: “Glamour” and “Cosmopolitan”

 

Conclusions:

These three lists are virtually the same in that they focus heavily on referencing pop culture, mostly through movies and TV (see the overlaps list above). The “Glamour” list was on of the worst offenders here, as many of the ideas should’ve stayed in that year.

But the same “Glamour” list also had the most creative costumes (see asterisk above in said section), in that clever, out-of-the-ordinary costumes were included.

Overall, these DIY Halloween idea lists need a fresh look, and more space given to clever costumes and not ones just blindly referencing popular cultural aspects.

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Child Marriage: By The Numbers

Child bride Thea

Child bride Thea

Last week, a blog by 12-year-old Norwegian girl Thea went viral. Thea blogged about her feelings surrounding her upcoming wedding to a 37-year-old man named Geir.

Later, it was revealed that Thea doesn’t exist. Her blog and story were created by international aid organization Plan to draw attention to child marriage. It worked, as the blog went viral.

Child marriage, defined as marriage before the age of 18, is still a large issue in developing countries. Here are some relevant stats, found from UNICEF:

Ratio of women ages 20-24 worldwide who are child brides: 1 in 3

Global ratio of women ages 15-19 who are married or in union: 1 in 5

World marriage rates for girls over 15 and under 18 years of age (excludes China): 34%

World marriage rates for girls under age 15 (excludes China): 11%

Region with the highest rates of child marriage: South Asia

South Asian marriage rates for girls over 15 and under 18 years of age (excludes China): 46%

South Asian marriage rates for girls under age 15 (excludes China): 18%